Secret Daughter

Secret Daughter

A Novel

eBook - 2014
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s
swerve1955
Mar 16, 2020

I loved this book. It deals with family and the reality and importance of women. I found it captivating, informative and very emotional. As someone very interested in India it was a wonderful glimpse into some of the realities of life there. I wasn't sure I would like it when I got it but I was amazed at how much I enjoyed it. Then ending took me by surprise but was powerful. My wife kept up with my reading and we had a number of interesting discussions.

This is a beautiful story, and it kept me up into the small hours of the morning. I am looking forward to reading more from this author. It is the story of Kavita (in India) who gives away her baby Asha, and the Americans halfway around the world who adopt her (Somer and Krishnan). This is a book about culture and belonging, and l loved it. (submitted by library customer YE)

j
janestream
Jun 27, 2018

What started off as a quick and interesting read became slow and tedious. I found the characters to be unconvincing and unrealistic, lacking in development and good dialogue. I put the book down at the halfway mark as I failed to feel any sympathy for the protagonists.

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GracieStrauss
Jul 28, 2017

The books is ok. An easy read but not much of a story. It's a very slow book. I found myself continually waiting for something of substance to happen but it never does.

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belalin
Jul 26, 2017

This is a good story but it is just that, a story. Lacks depth, fake dialogue. I prefer books with more literary value but this is an easy read and a good story nonetheless.

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Margush
Apr 16, 2017

Is an easy read makes a good book? Well, this book is definitely easy to read and...it reads as a newspaper article or ...a Bollywood movie script.
As the book is quite monotonous, I read only those chapters that showed some dynamic and skipped those that didn't. I liked more the Indian part of the story - it's culturally rich, colorful and interesting. America, as described, is a safe and pretty boring place to live in. Interesting comparison and choice of words, for sure.

t
trudat
Oct 01, 2016

Good idea for a story but definitely reads like a first novel. The sentences are a bit clunky at times, and the dialogue is cliche. That said, I appreciated that the ending was not as tidy and predictable as I expected.

c
carol507
Feb 17, 2016

Excellent book - abrupt ending

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Nica60red
Dec 25, 2015

Really liked this book

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Smile1234_0
Jul 27, 2015

I thought this book was really good and was entertaining from the beginning.

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greenacres
Feb 27, 2015

An education in a different cultures practices; heart breaking at times.

k
kozakd
Jan 05, 2015

This is an entertaining enough quick read. It would be perfect for the beach.

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ashleywalter
Aug 30, 2014

I found the book to have some heart but very monotoned and not a lot of depth to it. The content in the book and the plot is a good idea

Lexicon_ Aug 04, 2014

I agree with ms_mustard's comment. This story has heart, but not much depth. The relationship conflicts feel to easily completed, with the exception of one being left irritatingly unspoken.

Worth the read anyway, though. As someone who was adopted, this book speaks to an important part of the soul.

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ms_mustard
Apr 08, 2014

the story had great possibilities but I found the writing too shallow. too much of the story was told rather than revealed. there were too many great leaps both ways between negative and positive emotional states with no clues as to how or why - not shown through the character development. I liked the grandmother the best. there are many wonderful novels about India with greater depth - I recommend one of them rather than this quick read.

j
JWW_O
Feb 22, 2014

Good book - you understand both sides of the story.

ChristchurchLib Feb 19, 2014

"Knowing that the fate of her second daughter would surely be the same as her first -- death, in an Indian village in 1984 that only values boys -- Kavita sends her newborn to a Mumbai orphanage, where she is adopted by two American doctors. Scenes from Asha's privileged but isolated life in America alternate with Kavita's, in her village and later in a Mumbai slum, and both are shared with compassion and insight. Motherhood is of course a key theme, and may come full circle with Asha's visit to India as a college student." Fiction A to Z February 2014 newsletter http://www.libraryaware.com/996/NewsletterIssues/ViewIssue/5fdf91da-47ce-498a-9809-d124d568f696?postId=8c92a5c1-369b-4131-85d1-534a1bd46a6b

sharonb122 Nov 23, 2013

This book brings up many interesting topics: adoptions, motherhood, poverty, desperation, cross-racial relationships and ethnocentrism (which American U.S. are quite guilty of) typified by the character Somer who wants both her husband and daughter to be completely American. For me, the best feasture of the book was that each of the main characters grew, some in many ways, during the course of the novel. We all have much to learn in understanding one another, do we not?

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Booker70
Nov 17, 2013

The story was good but the book badly written.

l
lucky38
Jul 01, 2013

A story of an American woman who marries a man from India. They are both doctors and unable to have children of their own. They adopt a child from India. A good read, I recommend it.

m
mogie
Nov 11, 2012

I found this book to be contrived and superficial. I wasn't endeared to any of the characters. The writing was decent and for a first novel, decent. I wanted to like this book more.

branch_reviews Nov 03, 2012

Secret Daughter, set in two countries which have a very different feel, tells a story of two families bound by adoption. Kavita courageously walks from her village to leave her day old daughter at an orphanage in Mumbai – to save her life from being snuffed out by her husband who wants a son. Somer travels with her husband Kris to India to bring their adopted daughter Asha back to her new life in California. Somer’s disconnect with her husband’s country, culture and family is very obvious, and possibly the reason why the Thakars do not visit India as a family for many years. The reader follows the parallel lives of the physician couple in America and the struggles of Kavita and her husband who migrate to Mumbai in search of a better life which begins in Asia largest slum Dharavi. 20-years later Asha travels to India on a journalism scholarship, both fearful and eager to learn of her roots. The reader gets a peephole into Indian culture and looks through Asha’s eyes as she makes better sense of the meaning of family. Reviewed by KB

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Ashling59
Sep 25, 2012

Excellent fiction -- should be a movie!!!

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georgiegirl1234
Sep 12, 2012

boring in my opinion.

s
SusannahElf
Aug 23, 2012

Very poor writing, at times incoherent, annoying protagonists, contrived story line.


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